Markets vs States in today’s Europe: An Alpbach Keynote Debate

Screen Shot 2016-09-03 at 11.47.21.pngIn October 2015, I had the opportunity to debate, in Munich, Professor Hans Werner Sinn on the European Monetary Union and, more broadly, Europe’s economy . On 30 August 2016, at the Alpbach European Forum, I debated Professor Sinn’s successor as President of IFO, Professor Clemens Fuest. [Click here, or the image above, for video of the two keynotes and the debate.] This Alpbach Keynote Debate was organised along the lines of the following proposition/question

“The market economy is the best model. It will also successfully manage the challenges faced in the future.” Would you agree with this statement?

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In memoriam: Michel Rocard & the Modest Proposal for Resolving the Euro Crisis

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It was with great sorrow that I learned of Michel Rocard’s passing. Since 2013, when he wrote the Preface to our Modest Proposal for Resolving the Euro Crisis, Michel has been a valued interlocutor and supporter. Only a few weeks ago, we were planning to meet up in Paris in the Fall to discuss his further contribution to DiEM25. He will be missed.

Michel Rocard’s Foreword to “A Modest Proposal for Solving the Eurozone Crisis

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Greece, Germany and the Eurozone – Keynote at the Hans-Böckler-Stiftung, Berlin 8th June 2015

Hans-Böckler-Stiftung

CLICK HERE FOR THE VIDEO

Thank you for inviting me. Thank you for being here. Thank you for the warm welcome. Above all thank you for the opportunity to build bridges, to pave common ground, to bring harmony in the face of blatant attempts to sow the seeds of discord between peoples whose historic duty is to come together. Continue reading

On the consequences of Mr Draghi’s impending QE announcement – in THE ECONOMIST

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«La Grèce peut forcer l’Europe à changer» – La Tribune

INTERVIEWYannis Varoufakis Syriza's candidate for the elections of January 25 in Greece.

Yanis Varoufakis is a candidate for Syriza to the 25 January elections in Greece. (Credit: Reuters)
Interview by Romaric Godin, Athens  | 01/20/2015, 1:16 p.m. – 2597 words
Yanis Varoufakis, economist and author of “Minotaur Planetary” is a candidate for the party of the radical left Syriza in the elections of January 25. He explains his commitment and would have meaning for Europe led a victory of party
by Alexis Tsipras.

 

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SYRIZA intends to infuse a little rationality into Europe’s attitude toward itself – interviewed by PROFIL (Austria)

Screen Shot 2015-01-06 at 12.31.39 AMA fresh interview offered to PROFIL (Austria) on why SYRIZA’ s proposals for Greece and for Europe are radical only to the extent that they are rational and therapeutic for the Eurozone as a whole. CLICK HERE (in German only I fear)

Bloomberg’s Clive Crook on our proposal for ECB purchases of EIB bonds

Screen Shot 2014-12-04 at 8.14.23 PMIn an article entitled “ECB should fire up its helicopters“, Clive Crook comments positively on this proposal for QE by the ECB taking the form of massive purchases of EIB bonds. The article also surveys other important ideas that would, if the political will were to be found, be helpful in the fight against misanthropic, unnecessary, stagnation. Click here or read on… Continue reading

Revisiting the Juncker Recovery Proposals – guest post by Stuart Holland

Stuart HollandRegular readers need no introduction to Stuart Holland; co-author of The Modest Proposal, former British MP and aid to Jacques Delors, responsible for starting the conversation about the Eurozone’s need for eurobonds (in… 1993), creator of the European Investment Fund and a staunch advocate of the need to turn the European Investment Bank into the Eurozone’s pillar of growth (wi the ECB remaining the pillar of monetary stability). Here he is writing, in muffled exasperation, about the frightful Juncker so-called recovery proposal. [Readers may also take an interest in Stuart’s latest book Europe in Question: And what to do about it.] Continue reading

How can we govern Europe? Florence, 21-23 November 2014

Screen Shot 2014-11-19 at 12.54.17 PMConference participants include (in order to presentation): Richard Koo (Chief economist, Nomura Research Institute), Vítor Constâncio (Vice President ECB), Bill Mitchell (Centre of Full Employment and Equity), Frances Coppola (Economist, former banker), Pierre Moscovici (Commissioner for Economic&Monetary Affairs), Yanis Varoufakis (Universities of Athens and Texas at Austin), Thomas Mayer (Senior Fellow at the Center of Financial Studies at Goethe Universität Frankfurt).
For the complete program click here.

 

Today’s Eurozone seen from an investor’s perspective – Keynote (audio)

Screen Shot 2014-10-31 at 11.36.14 PMOn 30th October I was invited to address a meeting of German, Austrian and Swiss pension fund managers on how they should make sense of the Eurozone’s current state of play. In this keynote (click below for the audio and the accompanying slides) I present an explanation of the causes underlying the impossible dilemmas pension fund and fixed income managers are facing in Europe today. Plus a proposal of what the ECB ought to do to make a substantial difference.

For the keynote’s audio click below and, once its starts, open Zurich Powerpoint (and click to change slides when you hear the gong in the background)

 

It is time for the ECB to purchase EIB bonds: Bruegel’s Guntram Wolff sides with our proposal

recovery photoThe ECB’s recent dalliance with QE-light is macro-economically irrelevant. For a long while we have been arguing (see Policy 3 of the Modest Proposal) that it is high time that the ECB buys en masse EIB bonds, thus enabling the EIB to issue new bonds as part of a European Recovery Program; an investment drive that will mobilise the glut of idle savings, neither adding to public debt nor inflating financial assets (or, indeed, the fear of fiscal transfers from the core to the periphery). It is the optimal strategy for defeating deflation and whipping up growth without inflating asset prices. It was with pleasure that we recently read Guntram Wolff’s article which seems to endorse this proposal. Continue reading

Centralisation-Without-Representation: A reply to Frances Coppola, Simon Wren-Lewis and Niall Ferguson

euro crisis[This post was later published by Open Democracy]

Behind the European Union’s official ‘line’ that the worst of the Euro Crisis is behind us, a flurry of proposals for institutional changes reveal a deep-seated anxiety about the Eurozone. Indeed, in recent weeks, even the German finance minister, Mr Wolfgang Schäuble, went public with an op-ed in the Financial Times (1st September 2014, co-authored with Karl Lamers), presenting a proposal for a Eurozone Parliamentary chamber that would legitimise, and stand behind, a new office of Euro ‘Czar’ with the capacity to veto member-states’ budgets.[1]Screen Shot 2014-10-03 at 4.57.39 AM

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Frances Coppola and Simon Wren-Lewis on the ‘Modest Proposal vs Austerian Federalists’

Screen Shot 2014-06-11 at 4.02.33 PMIn Whither Europe? The Modest Camp vs the Federalist Austerians James Galbraith and I attempted to chart the evolution of various plans to save the Eurozone. In that survey, we juxtaposed a Modest Camp (that includes our own Modest Proposal), whose philosophy is to promote a minimalist agenda for stabilising the Eurozone and ending its socio-economic crisis before Europe’s future can be discussed cooly and properly, against federalist plans (like those of the Piketty and Glienecker Groups) for political union. Our argument (also augmented here) was that the prescribed federalist moves are, by definition, austerian in logic and, thus, ultimately detrimental to Europe’s integrity and even its… soul.  Most recently, Frances Coppola and Simon Wren-Lewis, at the behest of Open Democracy (who published our original paper), responded to our musings. Here are their responses:

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Mr Juncker should look to an EIB-ECB alliance, not to the ESM

JunckerJean Claude Juncker had a good idea but looked in the wrong place for funding it. His good idea was to promote a sizeable investment program (€300 billion) that would help Europe end years of crisis, stem deflation and return the continent to growth. Unfortunately, Mr Juncker thought it a good idea to tap the European Stability Mechanism’s unused borrowing capacity in order to fund his investment program. Soon after putting forward this idea, Germany smacked it down. Why was Mr Juncker badly mistaken to suggest the ESM as a funding source? And what should Mr Juncker have proposed instead? Read on…
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